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Julian Sturdy - Strong Voice for York Outer

Julian Sturdy

Member of Parliament for York Outer

Latest News & Campaigns

Government announcement on ending covid restrictions

Government announcement on ending covid restrictions

“Given the amazing success of the booster programme in protecting York households, and the latest encouraging virus data, I am glad the government has decided to let current ‘Plan B’ measures expire at the end of this month. Although I have serious concerns about the Prime Minister’s judgement on other matters, I think he has

Julian welcomes Cystic Fibrosis medicine announcement

I am delighted by the recent news that the life-changing Kaftrio modular therapy has...

York Press column – Finally we are learning to live with covid

As we move through the cold days and early evenings, we have the significant...

Statement on alleged Downing Street Parties

The recent revelations about the party in the garden of Number 10 on the...

Constituency Garden of Remembrance

November 9, 2021

Julian was honoured to lay a tribute at the first ever Constituency Garden of Remembrance in Parliament on behalf of those from York who have lost their lives fighting for our freedoms.

The Speaker, Sir Lindsay Hoyle MP, said he hoped the temporary garden – devised to mark 100 years of Remembrance as we know it – “would be a fitting reminder of the sacrifices made by constituents up and down the country.”

At an inaugural ceremony in New Palace Yard, the Speaker led the planting of Remembrance stakes with a message of gratitude to service personnel from his Chorley constituency.

Other tributes followed – both religious and secular – from MPs, Ministers and representatives from the Commonwealth and British Overseas Territories who also attended the service.

Julian’s fellow MPs have until tomorrow to plant their tribute. When complete, the garden will contain a Remembrance stake representing constituencies in the UK, the 54 member countries of the Commonwealth, and 14 British Overseas Territories.

The first Remembrance Day was held on 11 November 1921, following a campaign led by Earl Haig, Commander-in-Chief of the Army during the First World War, and founder of the British Legion.

This followed the unveiling of the Cenotaph in Whitehall by King George V on 11 November 1920 and the decision to adopt the poppy as a symbol of remembrance.